Without a doubt, the original Titanfall that released in 2014 was massively over-hyped and as a result, it fell victim to its pre-determined expectations.  The concept of Titanfall was fantastic.  The first-person shooter, with exo-suit parkour elements was a recipe for a truly unique gameplay experience and when you throw in the concept of the huge Titans, it was a game that should have generated far more success then it received.  However, with its pitiful campaign (if you can really call it that) and with it being essentially an online only game, it just didn’t have the depth to keep many gamers hooked past its first few weeks of launch.  Not having a proper campaign played a huge role in its downfall, as well as it having a lack of multiplayer maps and modes that an online only game should warrant.

 

Some might say that with the original Titanfall releasing only on PC, Xbox 360 and Xbox One, it also suffered in terms of sales by not releasing on the PS4.  However, as recent sale figures have proven, despite its sequel, despite Titanfall 2 now releasing on the PS4 (as well PC and Xbox One), somehow, Titanfall 2 has sold less copies at launch than its predecessor.  In theory the sequel should have sold more this time around, but many are putting its declined sales figures down to the fact that for some reason, EA thought it would be a good idea to release Titanfall 2 in the firing line of Battlefield 1 (and EA game) and Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare.  Seriously, why was that decision even made?  Someone at EA needs a swift kick in the bollocks for making this baffling decision, you plebs.  This in itself is a crime against the developers at Respawn Entertainment as they have clearly listened and responded to fan feedback and provided us with one of the best shooters to release in the last 12 months.

 

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Due to it not releasing on the PS4, many gamers had missed the first game in the series.  Yet with so many improvements being made to the sequel, with not only a more robust multiplayer mode, the addition of a singleplayer campaign is more than just an add-on to appease fans.  Give or take, this is a fun ten (ish) hour campaign that is almost as fast and frantic as the multiplayer itself, yet has plenty of well thought out puzzle/platform sections that help changes the pace of the campaign and some good old end of level boss battles thrown in for good measure.  There’s even a moment at around the halfway point which introduced an unexpected gameplay mechanic (for me at least) and while I won’t give that away, it’s certainly one of Titanfall 2’s standout moments.

 

However, while the main plot may have flown over my head, Respawn tell a decent enough story of our protagonist Jack Cooper who’s dreams of being a Pilot for the Frontier Militia and to one day be in control of his own Titan are unexpectedly brought forward following the demise of his fallen Captain at the hands of the IMC.  The bond between Cooper and his newly commandeered Titan named BT-7274 is surprisingly quite a powerful one with plenty of memorable moments from the campaign, which is aided by multiple dialogue choices which adds a little personal touch to its tale, though it has no real impact on its story.

 

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For many, the reason for picking up Titanfall 2 would be for its multiplayer component.  If you’ve played the multiplayer from the first game, then you know what to expect, but if you’re new, then you’re in for a treat.  The multiplayer is a good selection of modes from versions of Control and Capture the Flag, as well as versions of Team Deathmatch and Free-For –All.  And if you want t step away from using the Mech’s, you can also choose a Pilot vs. Pilot match type.

 

The main point of call for me would be a mode called Bounty Hunt.  In this mode you score points by earning cash by killing your opponent.  However, in order for those points to have value, you must deposit your earned cash in the designated cash deposit points that will appear during particular moments of the match.  If you die before making the deposit, then you will lose some of that cash, which makes the rush towards the deposit point all the more tense, especially as the opposing team will be doing all they can to stop you.

 

After trying out all the modes that Titanfall 2 has to offer, Bounty Hunt in my humble opinion is the most fun to be had and that’s not to say that the games other modes aren’t fun, because they most certainly are.  It will also be interesting to see what other modes (and maps) Respawn bring to the table, because if they’re as creative and fun as Bounty Hunt, then Titanfall 2 will have the kind of depth that the first game had longed for.  The only real odd change to the multiplayer for me is the manner in which the Titan’s are spawned.  Previously everyone’s Titan would spawn on a timer, regardless of your kills.  But now in the sequel, your Titan is spawned depending on the kills you make, instead of by timer.  I have no real issue with this format, but this will not be the preference for some.

 

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It’s also worth noting that Respawn announced that Titanfall 2 will not have a season pass like the first game, but instead all of its modes and maps will be free.  No season pass, no DLC packs at an additional cost, you will not pay an extra penny when new content is released, which is a move that must be commended in this day and age.  Let’s just hope that following Titanfall 2’s disappointing sales at launch, publisher EA resists the urge to influx the game with micro-transactions, even at a cosmetic level.

 

It’s such a damn shame that the first game didn’t have a campaign to the standards of its sequel, but it’s great to see the developers not only listen to fan feedback, but also acted upon it.  This is the game that the original Titanfall should have been and if this sequel is your entry point into the series, it’s a perfect starting point.  In fact, whether you’re new or returning to the series, just forget that the first game existed.  From this moment on, Titanfall 2 is the first game in the series.  Which joking aside is probably the best way to approach this sequel from a story standpoint at least.

 

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It’s a damn shame to think that EA thought it to be a good idea to release Titanfall 2 when they did, because it’s got somewhat lost in a typical busy end of year release schedule.  While the quality of the multiplayer shouldn’t come as no surprise, with the first game lacking as much as it did, it’s a welcomed addition that Titanfall 2 has such a compelling singleplayer campaign, but really in truth, it should be that much of a surprise, because this game is from the much of the same team that brought us some of the best Call of Duty games in the series.

 

It’s an always a tough choice deciding what games to buy this time of year, especially when on a tight budget.  But if you’ve been given gift credit for Christmas this year and you’re stuck as to what to spend it on, then I urge you to pick up Titanfall 2, especially as its bound to be in the sales this side of Christmas.  Titanfall 2 is compelling, immersive and most importantly fun, and deserves far more recognition then its sales figures gives it credit for.  It rights almost every wrong of its 2014 original and with it now releasing on PS4, it finally should be granted the audience it deserves.  Titanfall 2 is a game that doesn’t deserve to be lost in the crowd, as it is one of 2016’s best, hands down.

 



Author

Richard Lee Breslin
Richard Lee Breslin

Gamimg has been my life for 30+ years and will always be my passion. I have a BDes Hons Games Development and Digital Media, and I hope to one day turn my passion for gaming and writing into a living. My favourite gaming series are Resi Evil, Metal Gear Solid, Silent Hill, Assassin's Creed, Uncharted and The Last of Us. I collect gaming merchandise, comics and movies. I love football (namely Aston Villa) and WWE. I can also often be found wondering the outskirts of Raccoon City. Follow me on Twitter @Solidus5nake